Quapaw tribal Powwow

Quapaw tribal Powwow

Quapaw Moccasins

Quapaw Moccasins

CONTACT

Quapaw Tribe
5681 S. 630 Rd.
Quapaw, OK 74363
918-542-1853
www.quapawtribe.com

QUAPAW TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA

Crossing the line from Baxter Springs, Kansas, Route 66 enters Quapaw, or O-Gah-Pah, tribal lands. O-gah-pah means “downstream people.” The Quapaw were once part of the Dhegiha Sioux and the Dhegiha split into the tribes known today as the Quapaw, Osage, Ponca, Kansa and Omaha when they migrated away from their home in the Ohio Valley. 

Today, visitors enjoy Quapaw hospitality and a full range of amenities—a gas station right off the Interstate, a championship golf course, and a full-service upscale spa located inside their resort hotel and casino. On-site tribally owned and operated greenhouses provide fresh sides to tribally raised bison and Angus steaks.

9 Nations in a Day

Today, the northeastern corner of Oklahoma is home to nine tribes and four of them have headquarters in Miami—Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, Modoc Nation, Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, Ottawa Tribe and the Shawnee Tribe. The Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma has offices in the town of Quapaw, located less than 10 miles to the northeast of Miami. Two more tribes, the Eastern Shawnee Tribe and the Wyandotte Nation, have headquarters in Wyandotte, a short drive southeast of Quapaw. The Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma is headquartered in Grove, approximately 20 miles south of Wyandotte. It’s less than 30 miles back to Miami from Grove. It’s possible to visit each of these tribal headquarters in a single day. 

LODGING

Downstream Casino Resort
6900 E. Nee Rd.
Quapaw, OK 74363
918-919-6000
www.downstreamcasino.com

Downstream RV Park
Located at the round-about just off of Interstate 44, exit 1 at the Missouri/Oklahoma border. Call 417-626-6750 or 918-919-6750 or stop in at the Q Store across the street from the RV Park to arrange your stay.

ATTRACTIONS

Robert Whitebird Cultural Center
905 Whitebird St.
Quapaw, OK 74363
918-674-2522

EVENTS

July 4th weekend
Quapaw Tribal Powwow
Beaver Springs State Park
5681 S. 630 Road
Quapaw, OK 74363
918-542-1853

The Quapaw powwow is the oldest continuous dance in the country, according the tribal Chairman John Berrey. The Quapaw have been hosting a powwow since 1872.

For more information, visit the ‘Culture’ section of www.quapawtribe.com


The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma's Historic Preservation EFFORTS

The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma's Historic Preservation EFFORTS

Artwork by Katrina Mitten (Miami) Indigenous (Detail)

Artwork by Katrina Mitten (Miami) Indigenous (Detail)

CONTACT
Miami Tribe of Oklahoma
202 S. Eight Tribes Trail
Miami, Okla.
918-542-1445
www.miamination.com

MIAMI NATION

From Quapaw, Route 66 blends with US 69 heading west to Commerce and on to Miami, which is pronounced “My-am-uh” after the Miami Indians who were settled there at the time of the town’s incorporation in 1895. Route 66 very nearly follows the border between the present jurisdictions of the Miami and Peoria Tribes before entering the northern tip of the Cherokee Nation.

The Miami, or Kiiloona Myaamiaki—the downstream people—like so many tribes today, were gradually displaced from their original homelands. Like their neighbors, the Quapaw, the Miami homelands were located to the northeast. They originated from the Great Lakes region, with lands within the present day states of Indiana, Ohio and Illinois, as well as parts of Michigan and Wisconsin. The Myaamiaki were forced into Indian Territory by the Treaty of 1867. Upon arrival, the tribe numbered fewer than 100 adults. Today, there are more than 4,400 citizens of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma.

DINING

Josie’s Eatery
Prairie Moon Casino
202 South Eight Tribes Trail
Miami, OK 74354
918-542-8670

Wiihsiniko
Prairie Sun Casino
3411 P St NW
Miami, OK 74354
918-541-2150

GAMING

Prairie Moon Casino
202 South Eight Tribes Trail
Miami, OK 74354
918-542-8670

Prairie Sun Casino
3411 P St NW
Miami, OK 74354
918-541-2150

ATTRACTIONS

B&B Miami Cineplex
222 N. Main St.
Miami, OK 74355
Movie Info: 918-542-7469
miamicineplex@bbtheatres.com

Charles Banks Wilson Gallery
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M
Kah-Ne Hall
200 I Street NE
Miami, OK 74353
918-540-6250

Dobson Museum
110 A. Street SW
Miami, OK 74354
918-542-5388
http://www.dobsonmuseum.com/

EVENT

Miami Nation Powwow
Last weekend in June
Miami Nation Dance Grounds
2319 W Newman Road
Miami OK
Phone: 918-542-144

Charles Banks Wilson

Charles Banks Wilson began painting American Indians in 1936 as a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. While not an American Indian himself, he did grow up in Miami, Oklahoma, where four tribes have headquarters. Banks became known for depicting American Indians as they truly were, not as people thought they should be.

According to a University of Arkansas Library exhibit, Wilson says this transition “was not a popular theme in anyone’s opinion” because “Americans wanted the Indian to remain a nostalgic keepsake, committed forever to chasing the buffalo across the boundless prairies.” Wilson admits he was a bit baffled when people asked him “why I was making social comments.” He says simply, “I was just painting what my eyes saw.”

Wilson spent 50 years seeking out and sketching American Indians who were 100% of a single tribal heritage. He donated his collection of 65 originals to the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.


Will Rogers Memorial Museum

Will Rogers Memorial Museum

Cherokee Heritage Centre (Tahlequah, Oklahoma)

Cherokee Heritage Centre (Tahlequah, Oklahoma)

CONTACT

Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma
17675 S Muskogee Ave.
Tahlequah, OK 74464
918-453-5000
www.cherokee.org
www.visitcherokeenation.com

Andrew Hartley Payne

Andrew Hartley Payne was born on Nov. 16, 1907, the same day Oklahoma was granted statehood.  Payne, a Cherokee, was born near Chelsea, Oklahoma, and raised on his parent’s ranch in Foyil. As a child, he ran eight miles to school and back each day. After graduating, Payne hitchhiked to California to find work, and though unsuccessful at finding a job, he did find a way to earn some cash. Andy Payne noticed a newspaper ad for a 3,400-mile footrace—the 1928 inaugural trans-continental race to promote Route 66, dubbed the Bunion Derby, and entered the contest.  After 84 days, on May 26, 1928, he crossed the finish line first.  He used the $25,000 prize to pay off the mortgage on the family farm and buy land of his own. There is a small memorial park and statue dedicated to Andy Payne in his hometown of Foyil, right on Route 66, between the town of Chelsea and the city of Claremore.

Will Rogers

Route 66 is also known as the Will Rogers Highway, after the popular Cherokee actor and comedian. A plaque was dedicated to Will Rogers in 1952 at a point near the end of Route 66, where Santa Monica Boulevard comes to an end at Palisades Park, just above Santa Monica State Beach and the Pacific Ocean. The plaque reads: “Will Rogers Highway, dedicated 1952 to Will Rogers, Humorist, World Traveler, Good Neighbor. This Main Street of America, Highway 66 was the first road he traveled in a career that led him straight to the hearts of his countrymen.”

Cherokee Heritage Center, Tahlequah

The city of Tahlequah is about an hour’s drive southeast of where Route 66 enters Tulsa from Catoosa.  The headquarters of both the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians are located in Tahlequah. There is debate on the exact meaning of the word “Tahlequah” but in one story it means: “two is enough.” “The name, according to legend, derives from the Cherokee word “Ta’ligwu” meaning “just two,” or “two is enough.”  The “two” refers to a meeting between elders that presumably took place shortly after the Trail of Tears.  Three tribal elders had planned to meet to determine the location of the Cherokee Nation’s permanent capital.  Two elders arrived and waited for the third.  As dusk approached, they decided that “two is enough.”

www.cityoftahlequah.co

CHEROKEE NATION

Continuing south on Route 66 from Miami, the road leads through the Cherokee Nation, whose jurisdiction overlaps 14 counties in northeastern Oklahoma. The Cherokee people call themselves “Anigiduwagi,” which translates to “People of Kituwah,” referring to their ancient mother town, Kituwah, or Giduwa, located in present day North Carolina. While there are various explanations for exactly what the word “Cherokee” means, it is often said that other Native Americans gave them this name that translates to “People who speak another language” or “Cave People”.

The Cherokee were forcibly removed from their homelands in the southeastern United States as part of President Andrew Jackson’s Indian removal policy between 1838-1839. It is estimated that approximately 2,000 to 4,000 Cherokees died on what came to be known as the “Trail of Tears.” More than 300,000 people worldwide are enrolled citizens of the Cherokee Nation, making it the largest tribe in the United States.

ATTRACTIONS

Andy Payne Memorial
Route 66 and Andy Payne Blvd.
Foyil, OK 74031

Will Rogers Memorial Museum
1720 W Will Rogers Blvd.
Claremore, OK 74017
918-341-0719

LODGING

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa
777 W Cherokee St.
Catoosa, OK 74015
800-760-6700

EVENTS

Cherokee National Holiday
Labor Day Weekend
The Cherokee National Holiday celebration is held in the tribe’s capital city, Tahlequah, every Labor Day weekend. 

Andy Payne Memorial Races
September
Half marathon and 5k
Lake Hefner
Oklahoma City, OK
www.andypaynemarathon.com

Cherokee Art Market
2nd weekend in October
Sequoyah Convention Center
Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa
777 W Cherokee St.
Catoosa, OK 74015
www.cherokeeartmarket.com

The Cherokee Art Market is one of the largest Native American art shows in Oklahoma and features 150 elite Native American artists, representing 50 different tribes from across the United States. The Cherokee Art Market is held annually the second weekend in October.

Will Rogers Days
1st weekend in November
1720 W Will Rogers Blvd.
Claremore, OK 74017
918-341-0719


A member of the Creek tribe making frybread.

A member of the Creek tribe making frybread.

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Council Oak Park

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Council Oak Park

CONTACT

Muscogee (Creek) Nation
Hwy. 75 and Loop 56
Okmulgee, Okla.
800-482-1979
www.mcn-nsn.gov

MUSCOGEE (CREEK) NATION

Originally established between 1828 and 1836 by the Lochapoka (Turtle Clan) of the Muscogee tribe, the city of Tulsa has grown around the intersecting boundaries of three nations: the Cherokee, the Muscogee (Creek) and Osage.

Route 66 takes you west into the Muscogee (Creek) Nation right into the heart of Tulsa and passes within blocks of the city’s origin—the Creek Nation Council Oak Tree. Located at the intersection of 18th Street and Cheyenne Avenue, this tree is where the Lochapoka rekindled their ceremonial fire at the end of their forced removal from their ancestral homes in the southeastern United States.

The Muscogee (Creeks), or Mvskoke, as they call themselves, suffered under theU.S. government’s Indian Removal policies of the early 19th century. More than 20,000 Mvskoke were forcibly removed from their homelands in the present states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida and South Carolina and marched to Indian Territory in 1836 and 1837.

The Perryman Ranch

The Perryman Ranch was established before Oklahoma statehood and continues to be an 80-acre working ranch. The ranch was the Muscogee (Creek) allotment of Mose S. Perryman. Mose Perryman’s great-grandsons own the ranch today, which includes the 100-year-old homestead, the original barn, the sweet water well and outbuildings. 

Intertribal Indian Club of Tulsa
Second weekend in August
Powwow of Champions
ORU Mabee Center
7777 S. Lewis
Tulsa, OK 74171
918-838-8276
www.iicot.org

Annual Dream Keepers Award Banquet
First weekend in November
Traditional meal and award ceremony
OU-Schusterman Center
4502 E. 41st Street
Tulsa, OK 74135
www.cityoftulsa.org

LODGING

River Spirit Margaritaville Casino Tulsa
(Projected opening Fall 2016)
8330 Riverside Parkway
Tulsa, OK 74137
918-995-8518
www.riverspirittulsa.com

ATTRACTIONS

Creek Nation Council Oak Park
1752 S Cheyenne Avenue
Tulsa, OK 74114

Gilcrease Museum
1400 N Gilcrease Museum Rd
Tulsa, OK 74127
918-596-2700
www,gilcrease.org

Perryman Ranch
11524 So. Elwood Ave.
Jenks, OK 74037

EVENTS

Mvskoke Nation Festival
Throughout June
Claude Cox Omniplex and the Mound Building
Okmulgee, OK 74447
918-732-7992
www.creekfestival.com

State of Sequoyah

Representatives of the “Five Civilized Tribes”— Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee Creek and Seminole tribes—gathered in 1905 to convene a constitutional convention with the goal of creating a state government.

They chose the name Sequoyah, after the inventor of the Cherokee syllabary, for their new self-governed state.  The state of Sequoyah would have covered roughly the eastern half of Indian Territory. Congress refused the proposal and instead reconfigured the territory to include the western half, resulting in the birth of Oklahoma in 1907.

Unassigned Lands

Unassigned Lands were an area of 1,887,796 acres centrally located in the future state of Oklahoma. These lands had never been “assigned” to a particular Indian tribe within Indian Territory.

Two days before he left office, President Grover Cleveland signed the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which included an amendment to pay the Creeks and Seminoles a modest amount to relinquish any enduring claims they had on the unassigned lands. Simultaneously, the Springer Amendment (H.R. 1874) pushed Cleveland to open the unassigned lands to homesteading. Incoming President Benjamin Harrison’s administration made the decision to open the land to white settlement on April 22, 1889.

—Oklahoma Encyclopedia of History & Culture; J.L. Crowder and Stanley Hoig


Mary Watashe, Euchee, demonstrates how to make grape dumplings, a dessert considered a treat among many Southeastern tribes.

CONTACT

Euchee (Yuchi) Tribe
804 E. Taft, Suite H
Sapulpa, OK 74066
918-224-3065
www.eucheetribe.com

EUCHEE (YUCHI) TRIBE

The Euchee (Yuchi) Tribe is a state historically recognized tribe that shares land with the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. They are a distinct and separate tribe that shared boundaries with the Creek Confederacy prior to removal to Indian Territory. The Euchee call themselves “Tzo-Ya-ha” or “offspring (or children) of the sun.”

The last official listing of Euchee people occurred on the 1890 and 1895 Census rolls. The Dawes Commission estimated 1,200 Euchee at that time but legally classified them as Muscogee (Creeks) for the purposes of land allotment. This misidentification politically devastated the tribe, stripping them of their separate identity. They are currently in the process of filing to be recognized by the federal government as a separate tribe. 

EVENT

Annual Euchee\Yuchi Heritage Festival
First weekend in November
Glenpool Creek Indian Community Center
13839 S Casper St
Glenpool, OK 74033
918-695-0195  


Jim Thorpe

Jim Thorpe

CONTACT

Sac and Fox Nation
218 S. 8th Ave.
Stroud, OK
918-968-3526
www.sacandfoxnation-nsn.gov

SAC AND FOX NATION

Like the Euchee Tribe, the Sac (Sauk) and Fox, or Thakiwaki and Meskwaki, are bound together by a misidentification by the federal government during 1804 treaty negotiations. The Sac and Fox tribes are related by language and culture—having shared homelands in the western Great Lakes region. However, as the tribes were forced out of their native lands, the Thakiwaki eventually settled in Indian Territory in the 1870s while the Meskwaki remained in central Iowa.

Today, the Sac and Fox count a tribal citizenship of approximately 3,600—most of whom claim Thakiwaki descent. Their most famous tribal citizen is inarguably the athlete Jim Thorpe (Wa-Tho-Huk). Thorpe quickly made a name for himself on the football field playing for the Carlisle Indian School. He went on to win gold medals in the 1912 Olympic Games held in Stockholm, Sweden, where the Swedish king named Thorpe the “world’s greatest athlete.”

ENTERTAINMENT

Sac and Fox Casino
HWY 99
Seven miles south of Stroud
918-968-2540
www.sandfcasino/stroud

EVENT

Sac and Fox Nation Powwow
Second weekend in July
920883 S State Hwy 99
Stroud, OK 74023
800-259-3970


Iowa Tribal Powwow

Iowa Tribal Powwow

Bah Khoje Xla Chi

Bah Khoje Xla Chi

CONTACT

Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma
335588 E. 750 Rd.
Perkins, OK 74059
405-547-2402
www.bahkhoje.com

IOWA TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA

Leaving the Sac and Fox Nation, Route 66 briefly follows the border of the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, or Baxoje (Bah Kho-je)—People of the Grey Snow.  The name Iowa, or Ioway, came from the French Ayouais. Before being forced into Indian Territory, they occupied the Missouri River Valley region before being pressured into moving south and west (into present day Missouri and Iowa) by white settlement.

One People, Two Tribes

The original Iowa Reservation in Oklahoma was established by Executive Order on August 15, 1883. Its effect was to divide the Iowa Nation into two tribes: Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma located in Perkins, Oklahoma, and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, with tribal headquarters in Whitecloud, Kansas.

EVENT

Annual Iowa Tribal Powwow
Third weekend in June
Iowa Tribal Complex
Bah-Kho-Je Powwow Grounds
335588 E. 750 Rd.
Perkins, OK 74059
580-304-6731
www.bahkhoje.com

ENTERTAINMENT

Ioway Casino
338445 E. Highway 66
Chandler, OK 74834
405-258-0051

LODGING

Iowa Tribe RV Park
607 E 116th St
Perkins, OK 74059
405-547-1235

ATTRACTIONS

Bah Khoje Xla Chi
"Grey Snow Eagle House”
Rehabilitation facility for injured eagles
405-547-4299

Dancing Bison Ranch
“Che Washi Chi”
405-547-2402 EXT. 352

Iowa Horse Nation
“Soon Yee Ooh Kee Je”
Therapeutic horseback riding
405-547-2402 EXT. 302

DINING

Iowa Café
338445 E. Highway 66
Chandler, OK 74834
405-258-0051


Red Earth Art Center

Red Earth Art Center

red earth pow wow warrior dancer by nativeamericanarts

red earth pow wow warrior dancer by nativeamericanarts

OKLAHOMA CITY

As you approach Oklahoma City and temporarily leave tribal jurisdictions behind, a landscape of green grass, cedar dotted fence rows and low hills gradually unravels into low plains woven with silvery gold tipped Bermuda grass anchored in red soil. 

The state capitol doesn’t sit on Indian land—it was established on “unassigned lands” in Indian Territory.  However, the Oklahoma City metro area is bounded by several tribal jurisdictions: Citizen Potawatomi, Shawnee, Kickapoo, Chickasaw, Wichita & Affiliated Tribes, Delaware Nation, and Cheyenne & Arapaho. According to the 2010 Census, 3.5 percent of Oklahoma City residents are American Indian. 

Unassigned Lands

The “T-shape” outlined in red in the center of this 1887 map is the boundary of “Unassigned Lands.” Unassigned Lands were an area of 1,887,796 acres centrally located in the future state of Oklahoma. These lands had never been “assigned” to a particular Indian tribe within Indian Territory.

Two days before he left office, President Grover Cleveland signed the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which included an amendment to pay the Creeks and Seminoles a modest amount to relinquish any enduring claims they had on the unassigned lands. Simultaneously, the Springer Amendment (H.R. 1874) pushed Cleveland to open the unassigned lands to homesteading. Incoming President Benjamin Harrison’s administration made the decision to open the land to white settlement on April 22, 1889.

—Oklahoma Encyclopedia of History & Culture; J.L. Crowder and Stanley Hoi

SHOPPING

Red Earth Art Center
6 Santa Fe Plaza
Oklahoma City, OK 73102
405-427-5228

ATTRACTION

American Indian Cultural Center and Museum (Opening 2017)
659 American Indian Boulevard
Oklahoma City, OK 73129
405-239-5500
www.TheAmericanIndianCenter.org

EVENT

Red Earth Festival
First weekend in June
Cox Convention Center
Myriad GardensOklahoma City, OK 73102
405-427-5228
www.redearth.org


Traditional Wichita house

Traditional Wichita house

CONTACT

Wichita & Affiliated Tribes
(Wichita, Waco, Keechi, Tawakoni)
Hwy 281
Anadarko, OK 73005
405-247-2425
www.wichitatribe.com

WICHITA AND AFFILIATED TRIBES

Route 66 continues west out of the Oklahoma City metro area and enters the jurisdiction of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. This jurisdiction is broken by a wedge-shaped indentation belonging to the Wichita & Affiliated Tribes near the town of Calumet in the northern half of Caddo County. The Wichita, who refer to themselves as Kitikiti’sh, formally organized in 1960 with the Tawakonis, Wacos and Kichais—creating the “Affiliated Tribes.” Historically, the Tawakonis and Wacos were separate tribes who shared the Wichita language. The Kichais are culturally related but do not share the language.

The tribes originally occupied the lands of present day Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas before being removed to Indian Territory. In 1900, their reservation was divided into allotments which brought about the final destruction of the Wichitas' grass house villages and communal way of life. Two other tribes have headquarters within the Wichita jurisdiction—the Caddo Tribe of Oklahoma in the town of Binger, and the Delaware Nation of Oklahoma, also located in Anadarko.


Harvey Pratt

Harvey Pratt

General William T. Sherman and COMMISSIONERS in Council with Indian Chiefs at Fort Laramie, wyoming

General William T. Sherman and COMMISSIONERS in Council with Indian Chiefs at Fort Laramie, wyoming

CONTACT

Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes
100 Red Moon Circle
Concho, Okla.
405-262-0345
www.c-a-tribes.org

CHEYENNE AND ARAPAHO TRIBES

The Little Arkansas Treaty of 1865 assigned joint reservation lands in portions of Kansas and Indian Territory (Oklahoma) to the Tsistsistas—the Roped People, or Southern Cheyenne, and the Hiinonon ‘ei—People of the Sky, or Arapaho. But by 1891 their lands were taken away and each tribal citizen received a 160-acre allotment and the remaining 3.5 million acres of their reservation lands were opened to non-Indian settlement.

From Fort Reno, you can follow the path of Jesse Chisholm and his cattle drivers just a few miles north on Highway 81 and visit Concho, the headquarters of the Cheyenne & Arapaho tribes.  You’ll know you’ve arrived in Concho when you see the tribe’s Lucky Star Casino, offering gaming to locals and travelers alike. If gambling isn’t for you, try the REZ Restaurant and Bar, locally famous for their steaks and Indian tacos.  Continuing west on Black Kettle Road will bring you to the Cheyenne & Arapaho tribal complex where you can see traditional art by famous tribal artists like Harvey Pratt or giant non-traditional murals by up and coming street artist Steven Grounds.

Washita Battlefield National Historic Site

The historic site features a park overlook and interpretative walking trails.  Directions: From I-40 take exit 20 (Sayre) and travel north on US-283 to Cheyenne. In Cheyenne take US-283 north until it intersects with Hwy 47. At the US-283 and Hwy 47 intersection travel west through scenic downtown Cheyenne. Once out of town continue west half a mile and turn north on Hwy 47A. Continuing on Hwy 47A will take you to the new visitor center. By taking 47A a little farther you will arrive at the historic site.

— Some content courtesy of the Cheyenne & Arapaho Public Information Office

ENTERTAINMENT

Lucky Star Casino
7777 N Highway 81
El Reno, OK 73036
405-262-7612

Lucky Star Casino
N2275 Rd
Clinton, OK 73601
580-323-6599

SHOPPING

Cheyenne & Arapaho Travel Center
7751 N Highway 81
Concho, OK 73022
405-422-6500

EVENTS

Oklahoma Indian Nations Powwow
First weekend in August
Concho Powwow Grounds, Concho
Traditional singing, gourd dancing, war dancing and a drum contest
405-476-1134
www.c-a-tribes.org

Colony Labor Day
Labor Day Weekend Festival and Cheyenne Arapaho Powwow
South of I-40 off HWY 54
Colony, OK 73021
www.c-a-tribes.org

ATTRACTIONS

Washita Battlefield National Historic Site
GPS: +35° 36’ 59.76”, -99° 41’ 11.58”
www.nps.gov/waba

Black Kettle

Black Kettle was a Southern Cheyenne chief known for his repeated efforts to ensure his people could live peacefully on the Sand Creek Reservation established in the Colorado Territory. He survived the Sand Creek massacre of 1864 only to be killed in 1868 by Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer’s troops in a dawn massacre of a Southern Cheyenne settlement along the Washita River in Indian Territory.

Black Kettle National Grassland and Washita Battlefield National Historic Site

Black Kettle National Grassland is named for the Southern Cheyenne leader killed here in the Battle of the Washita by Lt. Col George Armstrong Custer’s troops in 1868.  The area was home to the Comanche and other nomadic Indian tribes who camped and hunted in the area, attracted by abundant water and wood and buffalo herds. The area became part of the Cheyenne Arapaho Indian reservation in 1867 and was opened to white settlement in 1892.

Washita Battlefield National Historic Site protects and interprets the site of the Southern Cheyenne village of Chief Black Kettle where the Battle of Washita occurred. The site, a National Historic Landmark, is located about 150 miles (241 km) west of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, near Cheyenne, Oklahoma.

— Oklahoma Tourism Department